Tag Archives: innovation

Want A Path To A Heroic Future? Now?

Try as you might, it’s hard to avoid the imposition of doom, gloom and political madness, now more than ever. Whether it’s Donny ‘Cable TV Host’ Trump, How The F*** Brexit, Everybody Elses Climate Change, How Do I Pay The Bills or just the damn cold and rain outside.

It is also hard, even with the increasing awareness, advice and efforts, to see past our preconceptions, education, life experiences and personalised media bubbles.

But, there are those that are particularly, and occasionally spectacularly adept at focusing forwards. One of those has to be Alex Steffen, who recently ran a successful Kickstarter campaign, that even inspired my own credit card into action.

Want to know what the future could look like, and more importantly how to make it happen? It is maybe easier than you think…

“I believe it’s literally true that we can’t build what we can’t imagine. The fact that we haven’t compellingly imagined a thriving, dynamic, sustainable world is a major reason we don’t already live in one.

Our challenges are epic. If building a better world seems out of our reach, then we need to become people who can reach farther. We extend that reach by embracing bigger visions. To become people capable of doing heroic things together, we have to envision a heroic future. That’s the mission: finding that heroic future, and the paths we take to get there.”

 

Heroic. Together. Now. Start. Be Bold. Fail. Learn. Improve. Repeat.

For more about Alex check out his website at www.alexsteffen.com

 

 

 

Is Liam Really #TechForGood, or #MarketingForApple?

29 arms of recycling innovation robot beautifully presented (of course) and they call it Liam? Only in the world of Apple.

Whilst hastily allowing myself to lose all focus on the writing I should have been doing today I jumped at the chance to join @TomRaftery as guest co-host for his #TechForGood Google Hangout tomorrow. As I explored previous shows to get a feel for my responsibilities I stumbled back across the ‘Liam’ element of Apple’s recent keynote.

The last few weeks have been something of a blur with many new discussions and projects appearing like the Rebel Alliance out of hyperdrive, but all with an eerily connected technology flavour. The Apple announcement was momentarily noted for their strong focus on responsibility at their key communications event of their calendar, before being usurped by the usual social media avalanche.

I’ve been a long standing frustrated critic of Apple, more from a wasted potential perspective than their actual social or environmental accomplishments, which have been markedly improving over recent years. Tim Cook has many achievements to take credit for, as it can’t have been an easy task to push sustainability up the priority list of the culture moulded by Steve Jobs.

Whilst on the day Lisa Jackson (SVP of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives) was conspicuously front and centre, and the privacy debate raging with the FBI obviously adding its influence, Liam felt like the physical hook of attention for a more confident responsibility ethos away from the usual line-up of product launches.

Yes, I know there are only so many ways you can innovate with a phone, and this could be Apple running out of innovative product steam, but the eternal optimist in me is seeing Apple want to be seen as more than just a purveyor of beautiful ‘stuff’. That beauty could be creeping into their approach to their wider responsibilities.

Liam is an allegedly, as I’ve not seen many at all, 29 arm robot that can in a mere 11 seconds recycle a notoriously difficult product into component parts like never seen before. I’ve dreamed of Apple applying its design mastery for a stronger purpose than just music and communications. Was this it?

Maybe. Maybe not. After all there is only one Liam, I believe, and at full speed, could disassemble 1.2 million iPhones per year. Actually, only potentially 1.2 million iPhone 6s units until they teach it about the rest of their product back catalogue. That total would be in the billions. Last year alone Apple sold 230 million phones.

Innovative? Absolutely. Open source and shareable by the whole industry to reduce e-waste? Probably not going to happen (but hoping). Expensive? Absolutely and certainly prohibitively so. Chances of Apple opening recycling depots full of Liams? Slim. Marketing gimmick or potential for true impact? Actions speak louder than YouTube videos, so we shall see.

With over 1 billion smartphone products alone sold every year. A few weeks after the launch Liam now feels more like a lonely Disney Wall-E type character, desperate for a real purpose, a few friends and more trees, but I continue to hope.

Join me and Tom tomorrow at 4.00pm UK to explore this week’s #TechForGood news.

 

 

How Can You Change The World Through Entrepreneurship?

Innovation Women Business Start UpSometimes projects appear like rabbits being pulled from a magician’s hat. You’re led to think there’s nothing in there and then hey presto, a cute ball of fluff gets dragged out by the ears.

Usually though, you plan like crazy, target your market and go hell for leather building a sales pipeline to regularly still miss out on the fun prizes that you really want. Hands up if you know what I mean? Good. Most of you.

Considerably less often such opportunities find you with a handful of carrots, an empty hutch, a yearning to breed bunnies, and all in your own backyard.

I can’t share too much quite yet, and my usual exuberance is again obviously overriding my (and others who will shout at me) sense of caution here, but I wanted to quickly reach out to those of you I’ve encountered over many years with a similar mindset.

Here’s the thing…
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Natural Born Social Good Evangelist

Moderating at Lundquist CSR Online Awards, Milan 2014.

 

It’s time to stop over-thinking and speed up the doing, and change is in the air.

Nine years after escaping the carnival that is the business of sport, with many, many commercial lessons learned, and a tough personal 12 months, the moment I hit the ‘Publish’ button a new era begins.

No huge upfront fanfare at this point, merely a few noticeable differences to the way things will be done around these and associated online and offline parts.

The short version is that the original experiment that was Coethica both excellently failed and stealthily succeeded. I did begin the introspection behind the evolution two years ago and the headline (underlined in bold) awakening was that I was an explorer, communicator, evangelist and educator that hardly ever got to play to my personal strengths.

Not great for business. Not good for me. Not any more.

The experiment with social media worked way beyond my wildest dreams creating multiple exciting, and often distracting new tangents, which ironically should have been a bigger part of the direction from the beginning.

So now with a personal account overflowing with social capital from 17 years of a wildly varied social good career that includes over 6 years of social media curation, content creation, network building and engagement, it’s time to spread my wings further, aim higher and fly faster.

I’ll be able to share the new clients and projects soon but I should mention I’d love to have one or two more technology companies in the new communications based portfolio.

Business needs to step up its game and here’s a few examples of what you see me doing differently.

  • As a brand ambassador / evangelist
  • Speaking and moderating at events
  • Supporting world-changing non/low-profits

… all with a stronger focus on leadership, education and innovation.

Over the coming weeks and months I’ll be more formally announcing the new services, and new clients, and I’d really appreciate your support by adding your knowledge to any best practice and thought leadership I find and share on my increasing travels through all things social good (including CSR, sustainability, social enterprise, non-profits etc).

To find out how I can help your organisation or for speaking engagements send me a direct email via david.connor@coethica.com or get in touch via Twitter at @davidcoethica.

 

 

 

Social Innovation + CSR = #3BLchat

Susan McPherson #3BLchatA quick date for your diaries, and a new hashtag to watch out for…

Next Tuesday, 17 December, I will be hosting the first ever #3BLchat for 3BL Media.

This 60 minute Twitter chat will see guest expert Susan McPherson explore “Social Innovation and CSR: The New Frontier”, sharing her wide experience and providing real world examples to inspire change and collaboration.

For more information about the event and our guest click here.

3BL logo #3BLchatIt would be great to see some friends Twitter profiles taking part during the event and if you can help spread the word to your networks here’s a suggested ready-made Tweet for you:

Check out: “Social Innovation & #CSR” – Tues 17 Dec, 1pm ET – http://3bl.me/9gxpzt with @3BLMedia & @susanmcp1 #3BLchat

Let me know if you have any particular questions you’d like to ask Susan and I’ll make sure we get them into the tight schedule!

I’ll be hosting the session via @3BLMedia for the event and I’ll remind people that I’ll be switching from my personal profile (@davidcoethica) just beforehand.

See you on Tuesday.

More posts to come soon…

CSR & Innovation

If I’m right and CSR has tipped and is truly embedding itself on mainstream management thinking were do we go next? Milton Friedman would not be a happy bunny.

Now imagine a world where every company had a decent CSR track record (a big leap I know but just go with it for a while!). How would a company stand out in this crowd?

In any successful business innovation is built into the fabric of the operation. I was reading the Scandinavian take on this at CSR Driven Innovation again after losing track of the project for a while and it made me think this wasthe reason it was sticking, a few are already at that stage of developmental maturity. My own CSR journey was galvanised by David Grayson’s book, Corporate Social Opportunity. JJ Asongu also presented interesting arguments in his article on the Journal of Business and Public Policy.

It’s about using CSR as a source for innovation not a reactive handful of initiatives to merely passify stakeholders.

The line on thinking also reminded me that innovative CSR is not the sole territory of corporates. One of the biggest opportunities to CSR forward is to work with that other group of serial innovators – entrepreneurs. The next Google is already out there somewhere in a bedroom or a garage. Where will CSR be on their radar? More importantly what support will they get? That unfortunately is a big problem right now. I’ve seen a few individual eureka moments but we need more than one at a time.

Innovative CSR will be part of the future of business and a fantastic way to gain a serious competitive advantage, whatever the organisation’s size.